Antiracism in Libraries: Allyship Starts with You*

For more information or to schedule this scourse, please contact Shannon Jones, AHIP at joneshan@musc.edu

The Antiracist movement garnered renewed vigor with the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, more people began to see a glimpse of what life is like for many Black Americans. This course aims to provide attendees with foundational knowledge about antiracism and increased capacity for examining their work through an antiracism lens. Being antiracist is not about who you are; it’s about what you do. Unpacking what it means to be an antiracist information professional is a personal journey, anchored by critical self-reflection on the impact of racist systems and structures at home, work, and local communities. These systems are pervasive but are often invisible to those who have had the privilege of not experiencing the damaging effects of white supremacy.This three-hour course is a call to action for information professionals who are committed to taking action towards becoming anti-racist.

Resource URL: [Pending. A password protected Libguide will be created for this course. LibGuide will include the agenda, presentation slides, bibliography and other resources] 

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to: 

  • Define racism, power, privilege, oppression, and white supremacy, implicit bias, and microaggressions.
  • Describe why racism continues to exist in libraries.
  • Articulate how racist systems in libraries impact BIPOC and other marginalized library workers and library users.
  • Cite examples of racist systems in libraries:
    • The role of implicit bias and microaggressions
    • How it affects hiring and retention practices
  • Describe what it means to be Antiracist:
    • Describe the difference between being an advocate, ally, or accomplice 
    • Begin the process of personal and professional self-reflection towards becoming a better advocate, ally, accomplice, and eventually, antiracist.

Agenda

1 to 2 weeks prior

Pre-work: prior to the session

Participants will be asked to complete 2 activities prior to the onsite session:

 

1:00 to 1:15pmWelcome, Speaker Introductions, Session Objectives

1:15 to 2:00 pm: Overview of Antiracism

2:00-2:15 pm: Break

2:15 to 2:45 pm: Articulate how racist systems in libraries impact BIPOC and other marginalized library workers and library users.

2:45 to 3:00 pm: Break

3:00 to 3:45 pm

What it means to be Antiracist:

  • Describe the difference between being an advocate, ally, or accomplice
  • Case study activity in small groups

3:45 to 4:00 pm: Wrap-up

MLA CE Credits: 3